Archives for category: fruit

This is the third and final Fathers Day recipe. Making desserts for my dad is tricky business, because he only likes certain kinds of desserts. He will swoon over key lime pie, but put a chocolate lava cake in front of him and his spoon will be untouched. Note to self: “share” more chocolate lava cakes with Dad.

My little sister went to Paris on a French class trip this past April, and in addition to buying me a shot glass and zero pairs of cute boots, she bought herself a French cookbook (and 2 pairs of cute boots), thinking that she would help me bake things from it. When my sister decides to help me bake, things can go one of two ways:

Option 1:

Little sister: Does this recipe have chocolate chips in it?                                                               Me: Nope                                                                                                                                      Little sister: K, gotta go.

Option 2:

Little sister: Does this recipe have chocolate chips in it?                                                             Me: Yes                                                                                                                                     Little sister: K, I just have to go get something, I’ll be right back                                                          *30 minutes later, upon hearing the telltale crinkle of the bag of chocolate chips being opened*     Little sister: Sorry, that took longer than I thought! Soooo, do you still need help?

This recipe does not have chocolate chips.

This galette tastes much, much better than it looks. The first time I heard the word “frangipane”, I was immediately suspicious, because it sounded a lot like “marzipan”, which I detest. Turns out, both involve almonds, but the key difference is that one of them is delicious and the other is gross.

Plus, making a frangipane tart is totally relevant to my upcoming plans, and to this blog, since the word “frangipane” derives from the Italian phrase frangere il pane, which means “break the bread”. It is also the surname of a very notable Roman family from the Middle Ages. I will find their descendants and make them this tart when I get there.

Things I would do differently next time I make this:

1) Make more of the crust

2) Don’t roll the crust so thin

3) Leave at least a 3-inch border of crust around the filling

Pate Brisee recipe (Adapted from Joy of Baking)

  • 1 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 6 Tbsp. unsalted butter, chilled and sliced into smaller pieces
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1 Tbsp. granulated white sugar
  • 1/8 cup cold water

In a food processor, mix the flour, salt and sugar. Add in the butter and blend until the mixture resembles coarse meal. Add the water bit by bit until the dough begins to hold together. Remove the dough from the food processor and place it on work surface. Gather it into a ball, wrap in saran wrap, and chill in the fridge for at least an hour (I actually left it in there for 3 hours). Use this time to make the frangipane and prepare the apples!

Remove the dough from the fridge and place it on rolling surface.  (I use parchment paper to prevent the dough from sticking to the counter, but a generous sprinkling of flour would do the same thing. Don’t forget to flour the rolling pin too!) Roll the dough out until it is uniformly thick (the actual thickness is up to you, but next time I definitely won’t let mine get thinner than slightly less than 1/4”). Once you are happy with the thickness of your dough, transfer it to your baking sheet, because once you add the filling, it will be very hard to move it.

Spread the frangipane filling in the center, leaving at least a 3″ border of crust. Add the apples on top, and fold up the crust around the sides, pinching it together where necessary.

Bake at 375° for 50-60 minutes, until crust is golden-brown, and apples are soft.

Frangipane recipe (adapted from Joy of Baking)

  • 1/4 cup granulated white sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 3 Tbsp. unsalted butter
  • 1/2 tsp. vanilla extract, or 1/8 tsp. vanilla beans
  • 1/2 cup ground almonds (I used slivered almonds, so that I didn’t have to blanch them and peel them first)
  • 1 Tbsp. all-purpose flour

Combine butter and sugar using electric mixer, then beat in egg and vanilla until smooth. Add almonds and flour and stir until mixture forms a paste.

Apples:

  • 3-4 apples (I used golden delicious)
  • 3 Tbsp. granulated sugar

Peel and core the apples, then cut into eighths. If you prefer bigger/smaller slices of apple, then don’t cut them into eighths! Once the frangipane and apples have been spread on the crust, and the crust has been folded up, sprinkle the granulated sugar over the whole tart before baking.

Serve warm or at room temperature! Or cold from the fridge the next day when you are pretending to get a glass of water!

There are too many people I like who were born in June. My spatula has grown weary, and the oven is threatening to revolt. No. More. Birthdays.

These pictures are decidedly sub-par, even for my less-than-stellar photography skills. Some days you just can’t make things look good. But when those things are covered in chocolate ganache and filled with raspberries and soooo shiny, you eventually have to put down the camera and pick up a fork. My limited sense of coordination makes it impossible to do both at once.

This cake is for a Nice Boy. He likes chocolate and raspberries, so he wasn’t too surprised to be presented with a chocolate cake filled with raspberries and topped with more chocolate (and more raspberries).

I confess to using box cake mix for this cake. I’m not sorry – I think box cake mixes are great, especially if you doctor them up a bit. For this cake, instead of adding water, I added milk (buttermilk is also a popular substitution). I also grated a couple ounces of semi-sweet baking chocolate into the batter, to make it extra chocolate-y. Due to poor planning and estimation, one of those cake layers is regular chocolate cake, and one is German chocolate cake. Calm down, it was fine. For the filling, I warmed chopped fresh raspberries in a saucepan with a little bit of this amazing jam I found in my fridge:

I filled the cake with the raspberries, and topped it with homemade ganache, stuck more raspberries on top, scowled at the mess in the kitchen, and that was that.

For the cake, use whatever chocolate cake recipe you can find, or use a box!

Raspberry Filling Recipe 

  • 1 box fresh raspberries
  • 2 Tbsp. Baco Noir jelly

Chop the raspberries into small pieces, then add to a saucepan along with jelly. Heat over a low flame for 2-3 minutes until jelly is melted and mixture is slightly warm. Remove from heat and spread over bottom layer of cake.

Add top layer of cake. Prepare ganache.

Ganache Recipe

  • 1 1/2 cups chocolate chips
  • 1 cup heavy cream

Melt chocolate chips and heavy cream together in a double boiler until chocolate is thoroughly melted. Pour mixture over cake and spread to ensure that entire cake is covered. Top with fresh raspberries if desired.

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